Friday, 14 April 2017

Reaching for the Moon (As Far as the Eye Can See)


Reaching for the Moon (as far as the eye can see)
vintage curtains, thread, metal, mineral pigments, makeup, paint, rock, light, 280 x 160 x 110cm

Gazing through a domestic lens our understanding of the world beyond is both revealed and concealed through ebbs and flows of knowledge. Reaching for the Moon reflects upon the complexities of our interrelationship with spaces and how cultural and social perspectives transform our experiences of place. 

Vintage curtains and their metaphorical associations with the discarded, the everyday, the body and gender are utilised to investigate the phenomena of viewpoint. Constructive and destructive making traditions examine tensions between the visible and the felt, interior and exterior space, social realities and romantic ideals that influence our perception and knowledge of our worlds.  

The moon is often cast as a cultural mirror upon which we project notions of hope, aspirational dreams, escape, utopia, spirituality, quests for discovery or a desire for universal conquest. It’s a talisman that connects us all but we also experience it differently, depending on our cultural and social veiwpoint. Gazing upwards at the sky our concept of the moon never wanders too far from the worlds we know best.








Sunday, 26 March 2017

Rise and Fall


Suzanne Davey, Rise and Fall, textiles, thread, ink, 180cm x 130cm x 40cm
Political storms of now and the rise of the right explored through kinetic textiles. Exhibited in Four Elements: Water Warringah Creative Space.

video


Tides rise and fall, waves rise and fall, storms rise up..... and fall away.
Water rises and falls with its own agency and we rise and fall in its wake.

The rhythms of ocean systems mirror social and political storms we face now; the rise of the right and political aggression and the resultant flows of people in the wake of these surges.

Webs of crossings and traversing, flows and networks of social relations, our fragility in the face of storms and the constancy of change are investigated through textiles. Utilising the language of sails and flags time and human action is made visible as the surface is ripped, pierced, punctured, repaired and stained and new connections are made.

Together with water we rise and fall, face change and unknown futures.


Installation view, Rise and Fall

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Gathering Shadows



Suzanne Davey, Gathering Shadows, ceramic, bricks, bones. wood, charcoal, shells, metal, 70cm  x 300cm x 300cm

Gathering Shadows is a site responsive installation that responds to the changing cultural history of the Coal Loader, Waverton, from its indigenous heritage, land use on the site, its role in facilitating the coal mining industry through to its current role as a centre for sustainability on the harbour foreshore. 

The work considers our inter-dependence with site histories (indigenous, animal, geological) and the potential future consequences of our collective actions and inaction towards environmental ecologies. 

Notions of temporal flows, site ruptures and dis-ruptures, surface wounds and healing are investigated.

The work explores clay as a media shaped by human touch and the ceramic traditions of containment. Unable to hold back their contents shells, small animal bones, charcoal and bricks flow and spill in the shadows of the ceramic forms. 

Installation detail Gathering Shadows, ceramic, bricks, small animal bones, wood, charcoal, shells, metal,
70cm  x 300cm x 300cm
  
Ceramic form detail, Gathering Shadows, ceramic, bricks, small animal bones. wood, charcoal, shells, metal, 65cm  x 45cm x 45cm

Thursday, 12 January 2017

Collecting Mountains



Suzanne Davey, Collecting Mountains, sound, ceramics, photography
 and mixed media. 220cm x 200cm x 150cm

Collecting Mountains is multidisciplinary installation created for EARTH: Four Elements exhibition at Warringah Creative Space. The project includes sound, photography, ceramics, plants, books relating to mountains, topographical maps of mountainous areas, domestic furniture, bricks and volcanic rocks. The sound element was a soothing Mountain Meditation repeated continuously. It was created by Wendy Wood, University of Derby, as part of a nursing workshop on compassion focussed therapy.

Collecting Mountains reflects upon our complex and contradictory interrelationship with geology and our passive observations of the altered ecologies of the earths surface as we go about our day to day lives.

The work investigates mountains as a cultural construct upon which we project our desires for conquest, escape from the everyday, for spiritual fulfillment, our thirst for exploration and aspirational dreams. They fulfil key physical and psychological human needs yet we transform them irrevocably via land acquisition, large scale landscaping, mining and architectural interventions.

The installation explores clay as an earth resource transformed by human action and draws upon ceramic decorative traditions of display in a domestic context, as passive background to our everyday experiences.

Collecting Mountains asks how we might re-imagine our future relationship with the earths surface and considers how we may evolve into a sustaining species through reflection and thoughtful action.

Ceramic detail, Suzanne Davey, Upside Down Mountain Pot, stoneware,
 metal stand, plant 180
cm x 55cm x 55cm


Installation detail, Suzanne Davey, Book Mountain, stoneware,
books (mountain books not depicted), 50cm x 60cm x 35cm




Ceramic detail, Suzanne Davey, Slices of Mountains,
stoneware, 
220cm x 200cm x 150cm


Installation detail, Suzanne Davey, ceramic from Shadowlands series,
stoneware, 25cm x20cm x 20cm


Saturday, 19 March 2016

Exhale: SEED STITCH Contemporary Textile Exhibition


Suzanne Davey Exhale, fabric, resin, thread, steel 140cm x 60cm x 60cm

Exhale featured in SEED STITCH Contemporary Textiles, an exhibtion curated by distinguished artist Soraya Abidin.  Exhale aims to investigate moments in-between: between our conscious and unconscious states and the interior and exterior spaces we exist in as we navigate the the whirl of known and unknown factors in our contemporary world.


Recieving the Betty Stirton award. From left Artist and SEED STITCH curator Soraya Abidin,
Betty Stirtons neice, Betty Stirton OAM and Suzanne Davey


I was thrilled to win the Betty Stirton Award! Betty Stirton OAM dedicated herself to textile education as a TAFE teacher for 35 years.




video





Thursday, 19 November 2015

What Remains: SALTWATER exhibition Manly Art Gallery

Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm
What Remains features in SALTWATER, an exhibition currently on at Manly Art Gallery. The ceramic sculpture and salt installation responds to the ocean as a dystopic landscape. It explores the sea as a place where contemporary human dramas are played out as people seek sanctuary and safe harbour, and as a site of irreversible ecological and geographical loss in a climate changed future. The work is a fragile memorial relic that references our complex cultural, psychological and corporeal connections to the ocean through motifs of human and marine anatomy as well as maritime architecture. Despite human loss and environmental destruction 'what remains' is the chance to seek new responses and political solutions to human struggles.

SALTWATER celebrates the vibrant arts community of Sydney’s Northern Beaches at Manly Art Gallery and showcases new art works by 45 Northern Beaches artists.
The exhibiting artists have taken inspiration from a single theme - Saltwater. “The concept of ‘Saltwater’ has been a recurring area of interest for Manly Art Gallery & Museum throughout 2015 and was chosen to reflect the multiple possibilities and perspectives of saltwater as an idea, a metaphor, a possibility, a physical place and as a cultural presence,” said Senior Curator Katherine Roberts. Saltwater includes photography, painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, glass and ceramics.
Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm

Suzanne Davey, What Remains, ceramic, salt, 50cm x 250cm x 100cm


Public Art Project Avalon Art Carnivale 7-21 November



Windsongs public art installation and flags both feature in the public art carnivale at Avalon. Created by Suzanne Davey, Christina Frank and Lisa Marshall they feature reconfigured discarded umbrellas and together they speak of fragility and the power of transformation.

Suzane Davey, Christina frank, Lisa Marshall Windsongs public art installation, mixed media 350 x550 x 400cm