Thursday, 18 April 2013

UNFURL: exhibition at Eramboo Artist Environment


unfurl: to reveal or unfold, become, uncoil, open, develop, expose, gradually change, expand, blossom


Suzanne Davey, Trajectory, side view, ceramic, thread, wood, nails, paint, sand, 40  cm x 50 cm x  30 cm

Eramboo Artist Studio celebrated its newly renovated Gallery and the three new studios with an exciting contemporary art exhibition, UNFURL,  held 1 March – 17 March 2013. It revealed itself to be a cutting edge centre of contemporary arts production and innovation by showcasing the work of eight of its artists. On view were painting, sculpture, printmaking, and ceramics by Irene Gorman, Lisa Marshall, Michelle Perrett, Eva Frengstad, Bridget Armstrong, Christina Frank, Suzanne Davey and Sally Howe. The exhibition was curated by Manly Art Gallery's distinguished senior curator, Katherine Roberts.

Eramboo is located in a beautiful and unique bushland setting in Terrey Hills in the Northern Beaches of Sydney. Here artists are mentored by artistic directors Susan Milne and Greg Stonehouse, two of Australia's most prominent public artists, to develop a robust professional practice. 


Trajectory, back view, ceramic, thread, wood, nails, paint, sand, 40  cm x 50 cm x  30 cm

Trajectory, detail, ceramic, thread, wood, nails, paint, sand, 40  cm x 50 cm x  30 cm

Re-Configured, installation detail, ceramic, sticks, steel, paint 110 cm x 120 cm x 15 cm

Re-Configured, ceramic detail, ceramic, sticks, steel, paint 110 cm x 120 cm x 15 cm

Re-Configured, ceramic detail, ceramic, sticks, steel, paint 110 cm x 120 cm x 15 cm

Re-Configured, installation view without lighting,
 ceramic, sticks, steel, paint 110 cm x 120 cm x 15 cm

Nest, ceramic, sticks, resin, wood,, 50 cm x  25cm x  20 cm

Afterwards, ceramic, glass, charcoal, paint, 20 cm x 45 x 25


Maquette for BREATH, fabric, steel, bamboo, 150 cm x 110 cm x 100 cm



Maquette for BREATH, fabric, steel, bamboo, 150 cm x 110 cm x 100 cm


A selection of sculptures by Suzanne Davey, exhibition installation view
A selection of sculptures by Suzanne Davey, exhibition installation view


Eramboo Artist Environment exterior view


Eramboo Artist Studio Eva Frengstad




Configuring Wonder: Sculpture at Scenic World


Suzanne Davey, Configuring Wonder, fabric, sticks, bamboo, 8 m x 6 m x 1 m 

Configuring Wonder is an installation that responds to the world heritage site of Scenic World (Blue Mountains, Australia) as a tourist attraction, a natural 'wonder', and a delicate ecosystem. It was created for 'Sculpture at Scenic World 2013' and exhibited along with the work of 35 other selected Australian and International artists. 

Suzanne Davey, Configuring Wonder,  fabric, bamboo, sticks, 8 m x 6 m x 1 m

Classical notions of beauty include three ’ingredients’: symmetry, proportion and harmony. These notions are also principles of composition throughout art history and abundantly evident in the natural world. Configuring Wonder applies these principles and explores the discord between notions of beauty and wonder and the use of nature by man. Using the ever present polygon in nature as the foundation for multiple forms they are distorted by the straining of delicate sticks against fabric, tied and tethered all while awkwardly 'performing' for the viewer. Between the large number of forms, and their interactions with the flora of the rain forest there is an uncomfortable striving for balance and equilibrium amongst excess (the golden mean).


Suzanne Davey, Configuring Wonder, fabric, bamboo, sticks, paint,  8 m x 6 m x 1 m


The work integrates closely with the site, allowing ferns and small trees to protrude through the installation. Over 60 fabric sculptures are configured in a large diamond shape covering 24 square metres and suspended on a wire net above the floor of the rain forest.


Configuring Wonder, detail of installation unit, fabric, sticks, bamboo, 80 cm x 45 cm x 45 cm

The fabric sculptures are varied in size and shape: some are tethered to bamboo frames and stretched and contorted; others are attached to a golden framework with sticks pushing and distorting the surface. In sunlight the forms are semi-translucent with the outline of delicate sticks visible through the fabric.


Configuring Wonder, detail of installation unit, fabric, sticks, bamboo, 65 cm x 40 cm x 40 cm


Configuring Wonder, detail of fabric sculpture units for installation


The installation was created in response to a site visit in 2012 and took into account the unique physical and aesthetic qualities of its location.



Rainforest site for Configuring Wonder


Configuring Wonder installation in progress

Tuesday, 16 April 2013

ADRIFT in Manly





ADRIFT, recycled polystyrene, fishing line, glow in the dark paint, bamboo
3.5 m x 4.5 m x  2 m

ADRIFT is an ephemeral public art installation created in response to Manly Esplanade; its physical qualities, and the way people interact with, and utilise the site. 

It was exhibited as part of 'SEE: Manly Public Art Project' along with the work of 23 artists. The project was the result of a collaboration between Eramboo Artist Environment, Manly Art Gallery and Museum and Kendal Henry, an innovative New York artist and public art curator. 

ADRIFT, recycled polystyrene, fishing line, glow in the dark paint, bamboo
3.5 m x 4.5 m x  2 m



About ADRIFT:
Manly Esplanade is a site where drifting occurs, both seen and unseen. The ebb and flow of tourists, weekenders, commuters, ferry's and boats, wind and water is a constant. It provides escape from the day to day, respite for many socially disadvantaged people and is a site of rescue for some. Along with escapist play and respite comes the flotsam and jetsam of broken boogie boards, surfboards, fishing floats and line, esky's and buoys drifting on ocean currents. 


These leave a dark aftermath: lethal litter for birds and sea creatures and toxic chemicals for our food chain. 





Threaded polystyrene shards (like 'neptunes beads' seaweed,  pearls, swimming lanes) respond gently to air currents. At night the installation glows, referencing the phosphorescence of the sea which carries the lethal drift ashore.






It started with a broken surfboard shard washed ashore and blowing around the Manly Esplanade.


Recycled polystyrene was collected and completely sealed to prevent further environmental damage.





 The coated shards were threaded on fishing line, arranged in an 'ocean current' pattern 
and painted with glow in the dark paint.




The final size of the installation was adjusted to the dimensions of the site.









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